A Few Words About A Little Field

Yes, this is about WNY v SEA and the little field.

I initially stated that I thought playing on a smaller than NWSL standard field wasn’t a problem, and I still think that. I think asking for and having granted an exception under the initial condition of a field similar to one the Rhinos or WNT played on, in itself, wasn’t disrespectful of the game or the player/fans. But what it devolved to and how decisions were made that chipped away at the standards of the league are the problem.

At some point a person or people decided it was OK not to sod a portion of the infield and NWSL rightly said no deal. At that point is when this all went wrong. How it was handled after that is what should come into question. Every person involved with the playing of that game bears some responsibility for it happening, from NWSL staff to a team GM, to both coaches, the refs and yes, even the players. If any of them had voiced serious concern or exerted any push back the game may not have happened.

It brings to light an all to often thought, one not made necessarily consciously, but one that is still there under the surface – it’s OK, it’s just the women. For so long the women’s game has accepted less than in order to survive that it’s become OK to look the other way when something even so obviously wrong, like the final size of the field for this game, happens. Everyone says “it’s not my place to stop the game” well, yes it is. It’s the place of everyone involved to speak up and stop something wrong. If any of the involved individuals had said “I will not play on this field” the game could have been stopped. The ensuing embarrassment and bad publicity could have been avoided. It would have gotten messy after that, but the game wouldn’t have happened and the respect the players need to feel would have been preserved. From all accounts no one did and THAT is the problem, not the size of the field.

It’s easy to say that Jeff Plush is responsible as the commissioner of NWSL, or the GM of the Flash, or Coach Riley of the Flash, or the referees are responsible, but the real truth is that everyone is responsible and everyone needs to do better. The players themselves are not absolved of responsibility and neither is Coach Harvey. Everyone knew in their gut this wasn’t right and yet everyone went along. The game was not played under protest as is often the case when someone feels egregiously wronged. The game was played and no prior public mention was made in protest. You might say that the players were just doing their jobs, but standing up for what’s right is part of every human’s job regardless of your vocation. If players want respect it’s been demonstrated again and again in the women’s game that you have to demand it, not sit on the sideline and wait for it to come to you.

New information may come to light, an apology has already been made and promises to not do it again, and if that changes my perspective I’ll update.

Just my thoughts on the little field in Rochester.

The Long and the Short of It

WNY v SEA was contested on a very small field tonight  – although within FIFA regulations, if not NWSL . I was gonna let this go, but decided I needed to at least set the record straight about where I was coming from. Whether you agree or not isn’t an issue to me, just that you know how I got here.

In my timeline on twitter, and I want to stress MY timeline,  Jeff Kassouf tweeted that playing on WNY’s field was “crazy”.

He has a following and of course word spread. More than a few people commented asking why the game was being played on this particular field and other questions about the venue. This prompted me to tweet this:

Typo aside, my tweet was a simple observation that many people tweeting in reply to Kassouf were critical without being informed about the venue. My feeling was – and is – when being critical of anything/or anyone, know something about what/who you’re being critical of. The venue change was announced two weeks ago giving anyone who cared ample time to ask questions about configuration, size, surface quality, etc.

My observation was not well received. That’s how it goes sometimes.

If I thought that was bad, the reaction after I tweeted this –

 

-was worse.

At the time of my tweet, and really still, I didn’t see the harm in one game played on a smaller than NWSL standard field. At the time there were no details about emails to coaches or meetings with referees or questions of safety from staff or players. It was a venue change for a team that couldn’t use their home field for one game due to scheduling conflicts. In the grand scheme of things, to me, this is small potatoes. I don’t think anyone from owners to refs to NWSL reps intended to disrespect players by asking them to do this one time for the good of the schedule.

The reaction of the players is a whole other thing. I think their reaction to this field is indicative of their frustration with so many other things that need to be rectified in relation to them. And although I support the USWNT players in their pursuit of equal pay for equal play, I find it a little self-serving that they chose now to chime in for their NWSL counterparts. This just gives them more to fight USSF with in their CBA negotiations, not necessarily a bad thing, but still self-serving.

Do I think the players deserve better? Yes, absolutely. I also think that even though this is the 3rd iteration of a league it doesn’t mean they’ll get everything right the first time. They did the wrong thing for the right reason, something I know I’ve done in my life more than once. So maybe that’s why I don’t think this is the big issue it’s blown up into, I think it’s more of a bellwether for the ills within the league in regard to player relations.

Many parties to this game had a chance to stop it, and none did, this says more to me than the fact that the venue was set up the way it was in the first place.

So the long of it is written above, the short of it is – life is complicated..and so is WoSo.

Professionalism Off The Pitch

“Let the product on the pitch speak for the league.”

You hear that often from supporters of women’s pro WoSo. And it’s true, the product on the pitch speaks volumes about the league. It says that the league is full of professional players who display the finer points of skill and technical ability in an increasingly more tactical style of play. But for the league to prosper and take it’s rightful place among all sports leagues it has to be professional off the pitch as well.

This weekend saw the beginning of the fourth season of NWSL. A landmark among women’s professional WoSo leagues in the USA. No previous league made it to opening day of season 4. It was an opportunity for the league to really step up and blow its own horn across the country in every member city, whether that team was playing at home or not. But it did not. For various reasons given there was no TV game, just streams that really weren’t any better than last year, and in one case worse. There were no sell outs, not one of the 5 venues managed that feat. Some came closer than others, but no cookie for any team. One team* had their home season opener at a venue that isn’t even their home field. Washington Spirit gave a nod to leagues past and the history being made of a season 4 by having pro WoSo vet and former NT player Briana Scurry do their first kick. Other teams did nothing..and I mean literally nothing to recognize the accomplishment. There was some MSM buzz, but not much, and some blog buzz, maybe a little more, but for the most part even some new fans didn’t know the significance of the start to the 2016 season.

On top of that, the few nods to this being anything special fell embarrassingly flat. The 2-time NWSL champions FC Kansas City were given their rings in a pre-game ceremony and in all pride tweeted a photo of the new rings only to have fans bring the glaring typo of NWSL as NSWL on the rings to their attention. The league in what I’m sure was meant to be a clever play on words debuted a new slogan of sorts that really fell flat before bouncing around the internet as a sort of Malaprop. STRONG HER – FAST HER – FURT HER debuted the new NWSL buzzword “furt”. And in what I’m sure was meant to be a grand gesture, NWSL commissioner Jeff Plush flew to Houston to announce that this year’s championship final would be in the worst kept secret location of Houston on October 9th. On top of the league’s less than stellar presentations some of the teams had their own faux pas, such as wrong team names in graphics, OTT homer commentators with wrong facts, and glitchy streams.

These are just a few of the things that stuck out for me this past weekend and are indicative of less professionalism off the pitch than the teams, the fans and the sport deserve. It doesn’t take money to do what Washington did with Scurry. It doesn’t take more than a few minutes to read the proof in the case of the rings. Someone with a good eye (and literally all that was needed was one good eye) could have caught the typos in graphics and whoever came up with the Strong – Fast – Furt slogan should go back to school or let a friend read your copy. It all smacks of laziness, or a careless attitude, neither marks of a professional.

I know the league and teams tend to focus on the big picture when resources are stretched and to a degree that’s understandable. What needs to be realized is that the small things that go wrong off the pitch can derail all the hard work done to make the players and the product on the pitch be as professional as possible. One glaring example is the post FOX Soccer did about the rings typo. That single post undid a lot of hard work by everyone involved with the NWSL to be taken seriously as a league. It will be the introduction to the league for many people and one that won’t make them want to know more. I don’t think FOX Soccer demonstrated their stated “commitment” to the league with that post, but the damage is done.

If this all seems a bit nit-picky to you, think about the saying “the devil’s in the details”. In the case of trying to attract and keep serious supporters of women’s soccer all it might take is a culmination of overlooked details for current supporters to say enough and new supporters to say not enough.

I’ll continue to try to hold the league and its teams to a high standard on and off the pitch. If you have anything to furt her the conversation, let me hear it in the comments.

*Disclaimer: I was at the FCKC v WNYF game in Children’s Mercy Park.

2016 – Season 4

April 16, 2016 – A day that will forever be a part of WoSo history in the USA. The start of the fourth season of a women’s professional soccer league has come and gone..and it was good.

The very first game was between the Washington Spirit and the Boston Breakers at the Maryland SoccerPlex. While there were some stream glitches and it wasn’t sold out, it did feature a first-kick by women’s pro WoSo and NT veteran Briana Scurry, a Joanna Lohman bicycle kick game-winning goal, the debut of Boston’s new manager, Matt Beard, from across the pond, and Jim Gabarra’s return to Maryland. The Spirit defeated the Breakers 1-0.

The second game of NWSL opening day saw the 3rd year Houston Dash dispatch the veteran Chicago Red Stars in what might be called surprising fashion as many have pegged Chicago to figure prominently in the playoffs. Houston’s draft picks showed up to play with both Rachel Daly and Janine Beckie scoring along with vet Carli Lloyd. Chicago never really got their attack in gear only able to generate one goal from Christen Press. The Dash defeated the Red Stars 3-1.

The other second game, sharing starting time with Houston v Chicago, was league champions FC Kansas City hosting Western New York Flash. The game was played at Children’s Mercy Park, home to Sporting KC of MLS fame. The now infamously misspelled “NSWL” championship rings were given to players prior to kickoff. The game also featured two uncharacteristically less than stellar games from KC’s  NTers, Sauerbrunn and O’Reilly. While Broon’s handball led to the game-winning PK taken by WNY’s Sam Mewis, she also failed to win anything in the air and was struggling to keep up when often stranded by her teammates in the 3-5-2 formation employed, O’Reilly was hellbent on making an impact often to the detriment of her decision making, not to mention being owned by WNY’s Jaelene Hinkle most of the game. HAO had the opportunity to make it all right when a stoppage time PK was earned by FCKC, but she hit it off the post and that was the game. Western NY looked solid and pressured KC in an unfamiliar tactical formation. The Flash certainly earned their 1-0 win over the Blues.

On Sunday the opening weekend’s first game was Seattle Reign FC welcoming Sky Blue FC to their fortress, having not lost a game at home, ever. The game was a bit of back and forth with Tasha Kai celebrating her return to pro WoSo with the SBFC opening goal. Seattle doesn’t often have to come from behind but they did with a Merritt Mathias goal to even the score. Sky Blue wasn’t having it though when preseason invitee Kelly Conheeney used a little backheel to put a Taylor Lytle chip into the net. That sealed the Reign’s fate and Sky Blue handed them their very first defeat at Memorial Stadium with a final 0-1 score.

In many fan’s mind the final game of the opening weekend, Portland Thorns FC hosting Orlando Pride, was the one to watch. There’s not much the talk leading up to this game left out; two MLS-owned teams, one veteran one expansion upstart, former star player returning to face her old team and fans, NT players on display, much touted atmosphere, new coach for the Thorns, wily Scot at the helm for the Pride. It delivered on all fronts. The stream was exceptional as always, even if the commentators skew heavily in favor of the home team, and the crowd was big and loud giving PTFC the boost they expect. The Pride struck first with the opening goal coming from former Thorn and current Matilda, Steph Catley on a right side free kick. The Thorns quickly realized the Pride were there to play and picked up their game scoring two goals that would see them take home the win. The first was from Dagny Brynjarsdottir on a Tobin Heath assist and the second was from Lindsey Horan again on a Tobin Heath assist. Heath played as we would all like to see her perform for the USWNT, maybe it was the captain’s armband that spurred her performance. As it turned out former Thorn Alex Morgan didn’t figure much in this game with only a few chances that went unfinished. The Thorns took this one with a final score of 2-1.

All-in-all a very good start to the league’s historic 4th year. The product on the field is as good, and I might say better than it’s ever been. Despite some glaring miscues – the misspelled championship rings being one, the NWSL “furt“her graphic being another – the intent to be better is there, it’s the execution that suffers.

Oh, almost forgot that the site of this year’s NWSL final was announced as Houston on October 9th. It was such a non-announcement that it’s easy for anyone to forget. Once again, it’s in the execution, folks.

Hope everyone is able to get to a game this year or buy a ticket to your favorite team even if you can’t attend. It’s all about getting more money in the game at this point. The pieces are coming together they just need more dollars to get them to slide into place.

US Soccer, Stop Trying to Make Fetch Happen

 

Change “fetch” to “One Nation. One Team.” and you have US Soccer.

Don’t get me wrong, I support our national teams, both of them. But to be honest not at the same level. US Soccer and I share that.
US Soccer is trying so hard to make #1N1T a thing. It is not a thing, it is a lame way to make people think the support for both teams is somehow equal. And while I think support should be equal, I don’t think 1N1T means what US Soccer wants it to mean.
Saying “One Nation. One Team.” doesn’t make anything equal, and US Soccer unwittingly is just pointing out the disparity in treatment between the men’s national team and the women’s national team.

We are One Nation, that is not in dispute by anyone in this respect, but we are not One Team. Not One Team in funding, or CBA, or marketing, or sales, or a myriad of other areas. We are also not One Team in the things that each national team needs in the way of support.
So at some level I am OK with not being One Team, I am almost happy that we are not truly One Team. In so many ways the women’s national team (and by my own opinion, women’s soccer in general) needs to be their own team. This does not mean that I think the women’s national team shouldn’t be afforded resources equal to the men’s team from funding to field surfaces and everything between, it means that the women’s team needs to be allowed to be heralded and supported by fans and the nation as it’s own unique entity, the same as should be afforded to the men’s national team.

By allowing teams to be unique entities under a One Nation banner each would be able to get the support & resources needed from US Soccer without the manufactured fan engagement 1N1T tries to force and fan engagement would be organic and long lasting. “One Nation. One Team.” just feels so false and self-serving to US Soccer that many, many fans don’t buy in and are resentful when they are force-fed the concept that feels disingenuous at its very roots. IF US Soccer really felt the national teams were One Team, the teams would have all the same resources available. I don’t think equal means identical, I think equal means what works best for each team. Each team program should decide what is best for their team – from development to t-shirt sales – within the US Soccer framework. That’s not to say that each program can’t share resources, just that they should fit with the team’s identity and speak to their fan base as well as to their standing on soccer’s world stage. Standards are not something that should be up for debate, both teams should have the highest standards, but other things are certainly able to be different.

US Soccer and it’s marketers have to embrace the different wants and needs of the teams and the fans and speak to that. They also have to understand the difference between wanting equality and wanting to celebrate your team as a unique entity. It’s one thing to want the same playing surfaces and another to want to be able to purchase a jersey in the cut and style that let’s a fan represent their team in a way that is both comfortable and appropriate to them. It is one thing to want a commensurate slice of the funding pie and another to be recognized in advertising as distinctly different. Equal and unique are not mutually exclusive.

In some instances using One Nation, One Team as a slogan works well, like the Olympic Games where bringing together many different sports, competing together at the same time, under one umbrella unites the nation as they oppose other nations. US Soccer has been trying to force 1N1T on the US fan since World Cup 2014 in Brazil, a men’s tournament where they opposed the world. A single nation, supporting a single team. In that context it worked well. But US Soccer is not One Team, it is two distinct teams at very different places in the world of soccer. To lump them together, under a slogan that serves neither when used together, is a disservice to both.

In some circles it’s unpopular to say that men and women are different in any way, but they are. Whether by nature or nurture, we see the world differently, we interact with the world differently and those differences aren’t a bad thing, just a different thing.

 

 

Dele Alli, Stephanie Roche – and the fragile English male ego?

It is not enough to just document ideas, they have to be refuted like @DasGherkin’s done. What has been bred in can be bred out.

Here is blog

There was much social media glee about Dele Alli’s goal for Tottenham today.

@DasGherkin noted its similarity to another famous goal – one nominated for last year’s Puskas award.

The responses she received – mostly from English men, it has to be said – were appalling but perhaps not surprising to those steeped in the culture and history of English football.

Football in England has historically been perceived as for men. Men play it. Men watch it. The women who have played it have been written out of history (there are multiple histories of the English game with a gigantic gap during the World War One years, when women’s teams drew tens of thousands to grounds); the women who have watched it have been written…

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To the Pros We Go!

UPDATE: (01/20/2016) It appears that Mallory Pugh is not going straight to the pros from high school. It was reported today That Pugh has decided not to go pro and will attend UCLA as she had originally intended instead. I think this is a very good thing, but I don’t think it should end the debate on players going pro straight from high school. All of my original concerns are still in play, just on hold until USSF or NWSL finds their next exceptional teenager. Personally, I would like to see the league address a minimum age requirement or at the very least put some sort of mechanism in place to assure that no undue influence is exerted on a teenage player and that they are afforded some way to attend college if they wish during/after playing. Maybe that could be as simple as having a portion of the player’s salary going directly into a college trust fund. As I said, I’m happy Pugh will attend college first, what do you think? Let me know in the comments.

 

Today, January 15, 2016, was the NWSL College Draft. Over 145 players declared their eligibility and desire to be drafted by an NWSL team (the final tally was more than the published 145 because NWSL said there was an updated list, although fans weren’t privileged to it). Not among those players was forward Lindsay Horan, formerly of Paris Saint-Germain (PSG) and currently of Portland Thorns (PTFC). Horan had chosen in 2012 to forego playing in college in the US and instead accepted a contract with French professional side, PSG. This was an unprecedented move for an American female soccer player and raised more than a few eyebrows and questions about what it meant for American women’s soccer. Horan was of exceptional ability for a player of her age and experience and had always set her sights on playing in Europe. The top French side, Olympic Lyon had expressed an interest in her while she was still in high school, but her family decided it was best for her to finish first. When she did finish, Lyon didn’t have room for her on their already stacked roster and a deal was struck with PSG instead. The deal was for a reported six-figures over the three years and had some provision for her to continue her college while playing in France. Horan headed to France where she played well for PSG, very well in fact, and also represented the USA on the U20 team. Through talks and negotiations none of us lay people will ever be privy to, Horan decided to return to the US. Some say it was so she could meet “criteria” for being selected to the USWNT, some say it was because it was just time. Some say it was back door negotiations between US Soccer, NWSL and PTFC to get her to marquee in Portland. There is probably some bit of truth in all the scenarios, but like I said, we will probably never know how much. The damage to the US college system that produces 99.9% of all US pro players was minuscule, if measurable at all. Three years went by and not another player bypassed the college ranks to go pro, in the US or abroad. Maybe until today.

You can sing the praises of any of the selected draftees from today, but I think it’s safe to say that none are in a position to contribute to an NWSL team at the level Horan can the day she steps onto the pitch for the first time in Portland colors. She is that good, and they are not. That alone makes her leaving for a pro contract in France not seem so important. The players she was peers with in 2012 are not as good as she was then and they aren’t as good now. And in my opinion, going pro, in France or anywhere else wouldn’t have changed that significantly. Which brings me to the news about another player forgoing college.

It has been reported by Soccerwire.com and repeated across twitter that 17 year old Mallory Pugh, of Mountain Vista high school, youth club side Real Colorado, US U20’s and now training with the full USWNT, will be signed by US Soccer and “allocated” to PTFC. This is a little hazy because NWSL changed their allocation rules significantly just prior to the 2016 College Draft. I say hazy because to me it’s not clear that a player has to actually be signed by a team or US Soccer to be listed as a USI. They just have to have the potential to be subsidized at some point in the future. For the sake of argument though, we’ll go with her being signed. If she is indeed signed and receives a salary she will give up her NCAA eligibility and won’t be able to play at college level if her pro career doesn’t pan out for any reason. (NCAA have made exceptions, but I can’t think this choice would qualify). She would be the first female soccer player to forego college to turn pro in a domestic soccer league and folks, I think that sets a very, very bad precedent, for US Soccer, the NWSL, the NCAA and women’s development in general.

As recently as July of 2015 Pugh was quoted as saying she just hoped to do well at UCLA, her declared college. That was just 6 months ago, not much time for a drastic shift in focus that will affect the rest of your soccer career and by extension, life. It makes me wonder, who influenced her thinking in those 6 months..and how..and why. While very poised and soccer savvy she is still just shy of 18 and probably dependent on advice and guidance from people she trusts and respects. Who is speaking to those people? And what can they have said to convince those trusted and respected sources that foregoing her education in search of glory on the soccer field is the way to go?

Nothing happens in a vacuum and I’m sure this is no different so I’m going to try to see if I can figure out how each of the entities involved benefits, or doesn’t,  from Pugh turning pro now.

US Soccer and the USWNT

– Is Pugh a dual national and is threatening to play for another country? Not as far as anything I can find. She’s born and bred US of A and not going anywhere.
-Will not signing Pugh to a NT contract in any way affect her ability to play for the full NT now or in the future? No. The NT has a history of college players playing with the full NT.
-Will Pugh refuse to play for the full NT if asked if she isn’t signed to a contract? I would highly doubt that, and if that was the case I’d be very disappointed if US Soccer let themselves be manipulated by a player that way.
-Is there any offer on the table from any international team trying to get Pugh to play outside the US? Not than anyone has mentioned or even intimated.
-Is there any reason, at all, that US Soccer should feel compelled to sign Pugh? No.

NWSL

– Does Pugh foregoing college and playing in Portland (or anywhere) benefit NWSL? Pugh isn’t a household word, in NT play or elsewhere, so the benefit of having her give up her eligibility to play in NWSL is of no real tangible benefit, monetarily or prestige-wise.
-Does NWSL suffer if Pugh foregoes college to play internationally? Possibly. It could be seen by domestic players that they are more highly valued if they develop overseas rather than through the current college system. I think sentiment is already trending that way as more players pursue playing overseas as a means to develop after college. That is a perception problem NWSL could manage without allowing this maneuver.
-Is there any reason NWSL should not allow Pugh to be signed by a team without going through the current development path? Where do I start? Allowing this signing by Portland (or any team) sends a very wrong message. It sends a message that education is not valued. It sends a message that this is an acceptable path to the pros for any player who is valued by the NT and can persuade a team to sign them. This sends a message that a player in such a situation can dictate where they go, without benefit of proving themselves at a high level. This sends a message that if you have the right team pedigree you can get whatever you want. I do not believe that if Pugh wanted to go to Portland, but NWSL said no this deal would happen. This sends a message that the NWSL will bend over backwards to kiss their own ass, something no league wants to be known for. This sends a message that an unproven player is valued more than any other player in the league just because someone sees potential in them. This sends a message that NWSL doesn’t care about the other 160 odd players they employ.

NCAA

-Does NCAA benefit from Pugh foregoing eligibility to play professionally in NWSL? No. There is no benefit to NCAA, none. In fact this harms the NCAA pathway to the pros in several ways. Up until today, the NCAA was the way to the pros. Players from all over the world have played for college teams in the US on their way to developing into a pro. Players have realized that an education is just as important as any skill they may acquire on the playing field when preparing for life. Title IX afforded players better conditions and more scholarships to be able to pursue that path to the pros. Now, players may seek to circumvent that path diluting the college product. With the advent of a USSF supported women’s academy, this could be a double blow to the college programs.

Women’s Development in General

-Does Pugh going directly from high school/youth club-foregoing college-to pro harm women’s development in the US? It certainly could. Up until today the overwhelming majority of players who enter the domestic pro ranks ( and more than a few international pro ranks) pass through the college system. They play for their high school teams and most also play for some level of club side, getting their education and keeping up their grades in order to be selected by the best college programs, where they will develop their soccer skills but also gain a world class education. Most women’s college programs have a very high graduation rate, meaning these players are equipped for more than playing soccer once they graduate. College allows them the time to grow. They gain size, emotional maturity and social skills. Their development is not only on the field.
-Does Pugh going directly from high school/youth club-foregoing college-to pro help women’s development in the US? No. Development prior to the pro ranks doesn’t happen if there is no vehicle between high school and the pros for it to take place. USSF wanting to create a women’s academy, similar to the men’s academy might be a place for it to happen for a select few, but it’s not a reality yet. Even if it comes to fruition, if it is modeled after the men’s academy the results and opinions about its effectiveness in developing players is mixed. Removing a viable path to the pros, or allowing it to be circumvented does nothing to help development of women players.

Mallory Pugh is a special talent and not one that comes along every day, but the precedent being set by US Soccer and in turn by the NWSL can pave the way for some nefarious dealings in the future. Having a path for future subsidized players to enter the league and be more evenly distributed upon entry is a good thing. Allowing a player to bypass the development system is not.  Some may argue that it will only be a select few who are as gifted as Horan and Pugh who will bypass the system, but that number could easily grow depending on who is in charge of the USWNT and its player pool and if a percentage of salary is allowed to be paid instead of the whole salary as is now the case. The scenario could easily be envisioned where a player foregoes college, is signed by US Soccer and is subsidized to the league and she doesn’t play up to potential and loses her subsidy the following year, or the year after. In this case she would have forfeited her NCAA eligibility and not made the pros..and now what? Do we make new roster rules or contract rules or player pool rules to cover this? And where does that new rule making stop? Does she make enough in that year or two years to pay for a 1st class education? Not in today’s world she doesn’t. Some of you may not put a high price on education, or maybe you just think that players beware. Maybe you think this is all no ones business but the player and the league, but you’d be wrong. Teams and leagues are only as accountable as they think we will make them be. If we let them think this is OK going forward, we will be to blame for that player who hangs her future on a subsidy and a contract and ends up with neither when things don’t work in her favor.

Worrying about what happens to players in regard to how they are treated on the business side is no different than caring what happens to them on the field. Existing players need better salaries and conditions before the league needs to find a way to get another subsidized player on their roster. Existing non-subsidized players at least need to be afforded the respect of not watching player after player be given preferential treatment in where they play or if and where they’re traded. Yes, it’s a business, but one made up of people, people who give everything to pursue a dream and just ask for fairness and consideration in return.

Women’s soccer in the US needs a lot of things to make it better, bypassing the college system to turn pro isn’t one of them.

As always, let me hear your side in the comments..